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PROOF - Food Insecurity Part 2


Title: 
Who is vulnerable to household food insecurity and what does this mean for policy and practice?

Date: April 13, 2017

Presenters:
  • Valerie Tarasuk, PhD – Professor at University of Toronto and principal investigator of PROOF
  • Lynn McIntyre, MD, MHSc, FRCPC, FCAHS – Professor Emerita, University of Calgary and PROOF investigator 
  • Pat Vanderkooy, MSc, RD – Public Affairs Manager, Dietitians of Canada
Description: 


Please join PROOF and CDPAC for a second webinar on household food insecurity. In this webinar, we will delve into the question of what drives vulnerability to household food insecurity in Canada. Drawing on the wealth of Canadian data collected during more than a decade of food insecurity monitoring, we will examine the social and economic circumstances of food insecure households and look at what has been found to underpin changes in household food insecurity status over time. We will also discuss the relationship between food insecurity and health, considering the evidence of a bidirectional relationship for some conditions. The interpretation of these findings by Dietitians of Canada in their recent Position Statement and Recommendations - Addressing Household Food Insecurity in Canada will also be shared as a platform for policy and practice recommendations.

Click below to watch the on-demand YouTube video of the webinar...



Click below for the presentation slides, and additional resources...
PROOF Resources
Dietitians of Canada Resources

  • Household Food Insecurity Portaview...
  • Position on Household Food Insecurity

Research Publications
  • Li N, Dachner N, Tarasuk V. The impact of changes in social policies on household food insecurity in British Columbia, 2005–2012. Preventive Medicine. 2016;93:151-8. view...
  • Loopstra R, Tarasuk V. Severity of household food insecurity is sensitive to change in household income and employment status among low-income families. The Journal of nutrition. 2013;143(8):1316-23. view...
  • McIntyre L, Bartoo AC, Emery JH. When working is not enough: food insecurity in the Canadian labour force. Public health nutrition. 2014;17(01):49-57. view...
  • McIntyre, L., Dutton, D. J., Kwok, C., & Emery, J. H. (2016). Reduction of Food Insecurity among Low-Income Canadian Seniors as a Likely Impact of a Guaranteed Annual Income. Canadian Public Policy, 42(3), 274-286. view...
The following are links to the research abstracts. If you are looking for the full articles, please email proof@utoronto.ca
  • Fafard St-Germain AA, Tarasuk V. High vulnerability to household food insecurity in a sample of Canadian renter households in government-subsidized housing. Canadian Journal of Public Health 2017; 108(2)
  • Ionescu-Ittu R, Glymour MM, Kaufman JS. A difference-in-differences approach to estimate the effect of income-supplementation on food insecurity. Preventive medicine. 2015;70:108-16. view...
  • Loopstra, R., Dachner, N., & Tarasuk, V. (2015). An exploration of the unprecedented decline in the prevalence of household food insecurity in Newfoundland and Labrador, 2007-2012. Canadian Public Policy, 41(3), 191-206. view...
  • Loopstra R, Tarasuk V. Food bank usage Is a poor indicator of food insecurity: insights from Canada. Social Policy and Society 2015; 14(3), 443-455 view...
  • McIntyre L, Pow J, Emery JH. A path analysis of recurrently food-insecure Canadians discerns employment, income, and negative health effects. Journal of Poverty. 2015 Jan 2;19(1):71-87. view...
  • McIntyre L, Wu X, Fleisch VC, Emery JH. Homeowner versus non-homeowner differences in household food insecurity in Canada. Journal of Housing and the Built Environment. 2016;31(2):349-66. view...